Eurovision Song Contest Sieger

Eurovision Song Contest Sieger "Europe Shine A Light" und der "Eurovision Song Contest 2010"

Måns Zelmerlöw. Conchita Wurst. Emmelie de Forest. Wer konnte den Eurovision Song Contest für sich entscheiden? Und was Lena Meyer-Landrut bei der Sieger-Pressekonferenz nach dem Finale des Diese Liste stellt eine Übersicht über die Veranstaltungen des Eurovision Song Contests seit dar. Jg, Veranstaltungsbezeichnung und -ort, Teiln. Sieger.

Eurovision Song Contest Sieger

Wer gewann den Eurovision Song Contest , , , , usw.? In welchem Jahr hat ABBA den ESC gewonnen? Wir zeigen alle bisherigen. Emmelie de Forest. SubtextDass der Sanremo-Sieger ägyptischer Abstammung ist, sorgt für politische Kontroverse. Denn das „Volk“ stimmte anders als die Jury-„Elite“. von Karl. Eurovision Song Contest Sieger

Eurovision Song Contest Sieger Video

All winners of the Eurovision Song Contest (2017-1956)

A maximum of 44 countries can take part in any one contest. Fifty-two countries have participated at least once.

Preparations for each year's contest typically begin following the conclusion of the previous year's contest. At the winner's press conference following the grand final, the contest's Executive Supervisor will traditionally provide the winning country's Head of Delegation with a welcome package containing information related to hosting the contest.

Once the participating broadcaster of the winning country confirms to the EBU that they intend to host the event, a host city is chosen by the broadcaster, which should meet certain criteria set out in the contest's rules.

The host venue must be able to accommodate at least 10, spectators, space for a press centre for 1, journalists, and the host city should be within easy reach of an international airport.

In addition, the location must also have hotel accommodation available for at least 2, delegates, journalists and spectators. In recent years, bid processes have become a common occurrence, with a number of cities in the host country applying to host the contest.

The contest has been hosted in a variety of different venues, from small theatres and television studios in the early days of the contest, to large stadiums in the present day.

The hotel and press facilities in the vicinity of the venue, and in particular the accommodation costs for the visiting delegations, journalists and fans, are typically an important consideration when choosing a host city.

The contest is considered to be a unique opportunity for promoting the host country as a tourist destination; ahead of the contest in Kiev , Ukraine, visa restrictions were lifted for European Union member countries and Switzerland through the summer of in a bid to encourage travel to Ukraine.

Following the first two contests hosted in Switzerland and Germany, the tradition of the winning country hosting the following year's event was established in , held in the Netherlands.

These exceptions are listed below: [13]. With Australia 's invitation to participate in the contest in , it was announced that should they win the contest, Australian broadcaster SBS would co-host the following year's contest in a European city in collaboration with an EBU Member Broadcaster of their choice.

A generic logo for the contest was first introduced in , to create a consistent visual identity. This is typically accompanied by unique theme artwork and a slogan designed for each individual contest by the host broadcaster, with the flag of the host country featuring in the centre of the Eurovision heart.

An individual slogan has been associated with each edition of the contest since , except in The "event weeks" refer to the weeks during which the contest takes place; the week in which the live shows are held and broadcast is typically referred to as "Eurovision week" by fans and the media.

For this reason the contest organisers will typically request that the venue be available for approximately six weeks before the contest's grand final.

Delegations will typically arrive in the host city two to three weeks before the live shows, with the "event weeks" in the host city typically lasting for 15 days.

Each participating broadcaster nominates a Head of Delegation, responsible for coordinating the movements of the delegate members, ensuring that the rules of the contest are respected by their delegation, and being that country's representative to the EBU.

Rehearsals at the contest venue typically commence on the Sunday two weeks before the grand final, and all participating countries will rehearse individually on stage twice.

Each country's first rehearsal lasts for 30 minutes and is held behind closed doors, with accredited press having no access to the venue but able to follow the rehearsals via a video-link to the nearby press centre.

These are then followed by a "meet and greet", with the participants meeting with press and fans in the press centre. The second rehearsal for each country lasts for 20 minutes, with press being able to watch from the arena.

This is then followed by a press conference with assembled press. After each country has rehearsed, the delegation meets with the show's production team in the viewing room, where they watch the footage of the rehearsal just performed and where the producers or delegations make known any special requirements or changes which are needed.

A summary of the questions and answers which emerge from the press conferences is produced by the host press office and distributed to the accredited press.

The typical schedule for these individual rehearsals sees the semi-finalists conducting their first rehearsal from the first Sunday through to the following Wednesday, with countries typically rehearsing in the order in which they will perform during the live semi-finals.

The semi-finalists' second rehearsals then usually take place from the Thursday to the Saturday in the week before the live shows.

The delegations from the host country and the "Big Five" automatic finalists will arrive later, and typically hold their first rehearsal on the Friday or Saturday before "Eurovision week", and the second rehearsal on the Sunday.

Each live show is preceded by three dress rehearsals, where the whole show is performed in the same way as it will be presented on TV.

The first dress rehearsal, held during the afternoon of the day before the live show, is open to the press. The second and third dress rehearsals, held the night before the contest and during the afternoon on the day, are open to the public, with tickets being sold in the same way as for the live shows.

In addition, the second dress rehearsal is also used for a recorded back-up in case of technological failure, and is also the show on which the juries will base their votes.

A number of receptions and parties are typically held during the "event weeks", held by the contest organisers as well as by the various delegations.

Traditionally, a Welcome Reception is held on the Sunday preceding the live shows, which features a red carpet ceremony for all the participating countries.

This is typically held at an opulent venue in the host city, with grand theatres and city halls having featured at recent contests, and is usually accompanied by live music, complimentary food and drink and a fireworks display.

Accredited delegates, press and fans have access to an official nightclub , the "EuroClub", during the "events week", which is not open to the public.

In addition to the main Eurovision title, other prizes have traditionally been bestowed, both by the Eurovision organisers and by fan organisations.

The winners of these three awards will typically receive a trophy, which is traditionally handed out backstage shortly before the grand final.

A detailed set of rules is produced for each contest, written by the European Broadcasting Union and approved by the contest's Reference Group. These rules have changed over time, and typically outline the eligibility of the competing songs, the contest's format, the voting system to be used to determine the winner and how the results will be presented, the values of the contest to which all participating broadcasters must agree, and distribution and broadcasting rights for both broadcasters participating in the contest and those which do not or cannot enter.

The contest is organised annually by the European Broadcasting Union EBU , together with the participating broadcaster of the host country.

The contest is overseen by the Reference Group on behalf of all participating broadcasters, who are each represented by a nominated Head of Delegation.

The Head of Delegation for each country is responsible for leading their country's delegation at the event, and is their country's contact person with the EBU.

A country's delegation will typically include a Head of Press, the contest participants, the songwriters and composers, backing performers, and the artist's entourage, and can range from 20 to 50 people depending on the country.

Since the first editions of the contest, the contest's voting procedure has been presided over by a scrutineer nominated by the EBU, who is responsible for ensuring that all points are allocated correctly and in turn.

This has evolved into the present-day role of the Executive Supervisor, who along with overseeing the voting is also responsible for ensuring the organisation of the contest on behalf of the EBU, enforcing the rules and overseeing the TV production during the live shows.

The Reference Group is the contest's executive committee and works on behalf of all participating countries in the contest. The group meets four to five times a year on behalf of all participating broadcasters, and its role is to approve the development and format of the contest, secure financing, control the contest's branding, raise public awareness, and to oversee the yearly preparations of the contest with the host broadcaster.

The rules of the contest set out which songs may be eligible to compete. As the contest is for new compositions, and in order to prevent any one competing entry from having an advantage compared to the other entries, the contest organisers typically set a restriction on when a song may be released to be considered eligible.

The contest has never had a rule in place dictating the nationality or country of birth of the competing artists; many smaller competing countries, such as Luxembourg and Monaco , were regularly represented by artists and composers from other countries, and several winning artists in the contest's history have held a different nationality or were born in a different country to that which they represented in the contest.

Each competing performance may only feature a maximum of six people on stage, and may not contain live animals.

Live music has been an integral part of the contest since its first edition. The main vocals of the competing songs must be sung live on stage, however other rules on pre-recorded musical accompaniment have changed over time.

The orchestra was a prominent feature of the contest from to Pre-recorded backing tracks were first allowed in the contest in , but under this rule the only instruments which could be pre-recorded had to also be seen being "performed" on stage; in , this rule was changed to allow all instrumental music to be pre-recorded, however the host country was still required to provide an orchestra.

Before , all vocals were required to be performed live, with no natural voices of any kind or vocal imitations allowed on backing tracks. As Eurovision is a song contest, all competing entries must include vocals and lyrics of some kind; purely instrumental pieces have never been allowed.

From to , there were no rules in place to dictate which language a country may perform in, however all entries up to were performed in one of their countries' national languages.

In , Sweden's Ingvar Wixell broke with this tradition to perform his song in English, " Absent Friend ", which had originally been performed at the Swedish national final in Swedish.

The language rule was first abolished in , allowing all participating countries to sing in the language of their choice; [] [] the rule was reintroduced ahead of the contest , however as the process for choosing the entries for Belgium and Germany had already begun before the rule change, they were permitted to perform in English.

Since the abolition of the language rule, the large majority of entries at each year's contest are now performed in English, given its status as a lingua franca ; at the contest , only four songs were performed in a language other than English.

However at the contest , following Salvador Sobral 's victory with a song in Portuguese , that year's contest marked an increased number of entries in another language than English, which was repeated again in The abolition of the language rule has, however, provided opportunities for artists to perform songs which would not have been possible previously.

A number of competing entries have been performed in an invented language: in , Urban Trad came second for Belgium with the song " Sanomi "; in , Treble represented the Netherlands with " Amambanda ", performed in both English and an artificial language; and in , Ishtar represented Belgium with " O Julissi ".

As the contest is presented in both English and French, at least one of the contest's hosts must be able to speak French as well as English. The order in which the competing countries perform had historically been decided through a random draw, however since the order has been decided by the contest's producers, and submitted to the EBU Executive Supervisor and Reference Group for approval before being announced publicly.

This change was introduced in order to provide a better experience for television viewers, making the show more exciting and allowing all countries to stand out by avoiding cases where songs of similar style or tempo were performed in sequence.

The process change in led to a mixed reaction from fans of the contests, with some expressing concern over potential corruption in allowing the producers to decide at which point each country would perform, while others were more optimistic about the change.

Various voting system have been used in the contest's history to determine the placing of the competing songs. The current system has been in place since , which works on the basis of positional voting.

Each set of points consists of 1—8, 10 and 12 points to the jury and public's 10 favourite songs, with the most preferred song receiving 12 points.

Historically, each country's points were determined by a jury, which has at times consisted of members of the public, music professionals, or both in combination.

The current voting system is a modification of that used in the contest since , when the "1—8, 10, 12 points" system was first introduced.

Until , each country provided one set of points, representing the votes of either the country's jury, public or, since the grand final, the votes of both combined.

Since , each country's votes have been announced as part of a voting segment of the contest's broadcast. After each country's votes have been calculated and verified, and following performances during the interval, the presenter s of the contest will call upon a spokesperson in each country in turn to invite them to announce the results of their country's vote in English or French.

The votes from each country are tallied via a scoreboard , which typically shows the total number of points each country has so far received, as well as the points being given out by the country currently being called upon by the presenter s.

The scoreboard was first introduced in ; voting at the first contest was held behind closed doors, but taking inspiration from the UK's Festival of British Popular Songs which featured voting by regional juries, the EBU decided to incorporate this idea into its own contest.

Historically, each country's spokesperson would announce all points being given out in sequence, which would then be repeated by the contest's presenter s in both English and French.

With the increase in the number of competing countries, and therefore the number of countries voting in the final, the voting sequence soon became a lengthy process.

From , in order to save time, only each country's 8, 10 and 12 points were announced by their spokesperson, with points automatically added to the scoreboard.

From to , the order in which the participating countries announced their votes was in reverse order of the presentation of their songs; from to , countries were called upon in the same order in which they presented their songs, with the exception of the contest, where a drawing of lots was used to decide the order in which countries were called upon.

This order is based upon the jury results submitted after the "jury final" dress rehearsal the day before the grand final, in order to create a more suspenseful experience for the viewing public.

Since , when the votes of each country's jury and public are announced separately, the voting presentation begins with each country's spokespersons being called upon in turn to announce the points of their country's professional jury.

Once the jury points from all countries have been announced, the contest's presenter s will then announce the total public points received for each finalist, with the results of all countries consolidated into a single value for each participating country.

Since , the rules of the contest outline how to determine the winning country in cases where two or more countries have the same number of points at the end of the voting.

The method of breaking a tie has changed over time, and the current tie-break rule has been in place since In this event, a combined national televoting and jury result is calculated for each country, and the winner is the song which has obtained points from the highest number of countries.

The first tie-break rule was introduced following the contest, when four of the sixteen countries taking part—France, Spain, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom—all finished the voting with an equal number of votes.

As of [update] , on only one occasion since has there been a tie for first place: in , at the end of the voting procedure both Sweden and France had received points each.

The tie-breaking rule in place at the time specified that the country which had received the most sets of 12 points would be declared the winner; if there was still a tie, then the 10 points received, followed by 8 points, etc.

Both France and Sweden had received four sets of 12 points, however as Sweden had received more individual 10 points than France, Sweden's Carola was declared the winner.

A number of steps have been established to ensure that a valid voting result is obtained and that transparency in the vote and results is observed.

Each country's professional jury, as well as the individual jury members, must meet a set criteria to be eligible, regarding professional background, and diversity in gender and age.

A set criteria is outlined against which the competing entries should be evaluated against, and all jury members pledge in writing that they will use this criteria when ranking the entries, as well as stating that they are not connected to any of the contestants in any way that could influence their decision.

Additionally, jury members may only sit on a jury once every three years. Each jury member votes independently of the other members of the jury, and no discussion or deliberation about the vote between members is permitted.

Since , the televoting in each country has been overseen by the contest's official voting partner, the German-based Digame. This company gathers all televotes and, since , jury votes in all countries, which are then processed by the company's Pan-European Response Platform, based out of their Voting Control Centre in Cologne , Germany.

This system ensures that all votes are counted in accordance with the rules, and that any attempts to unfairly influence the vote are detected and mitigated.

Participating broadcasters from competing countries are required to air live the semi-final in which they compete, or in the case of the automatic finalists the semi-final in which they are required to vote, and the grand final, in its entirety, including all competing songs, the voting recap which contains short clips of the performances, the voting procedure or semi-final qualification reveal, and in the grand final the reprise of the winning song.

The contest was first produced in colour in , and has been broadcast in widescreen since , and in high-definition since An archiving project was initiated by the EBU in , aiming to collate footage from all editions of the contest and related materials from its history ahead of the contest's 60th anniversary in The first contest in was primarily a radio show, however cameras were present to broadcast the show for the few Europeans who had a television set; any video footage which may have been recorded has since been lost over time, however audio of the contest has been preserved and a short newsreel of the winning reprise has survived.

The copyright of each individual contest from to is held by the organising host broadcaster for that year's contest.

Since , the rights to each contest are now held centrally by the EBU. From the original seven countries which entered the first contest in , the number of competing countries has steadily grown over time, with over 20 countries regularly competing by the late s.

The first discussions around modifying the contest's format to account for the growth in competing countries took place in the s.

In , with the contest now ten years old, the EBU invited participating broadcasters to share proposals for the future of the contest after the Luxembourgish broadcaster CLT expressed doubts about their ability to stage the contest.

Besides slight modifications to the voting system in use and other rules, no fundamental changes to the contest's format were introduced until the early s, when changes in Europe in the late s and early s saw the formation of new countries and interest in the contest from countries in the former Eastern Bloc began to grow, particularly after the cessation of the Eastern European rival OIRT network and its merger with the EBU in To reduce this number, the contest organisers implemented a preselection method for the first time, to reduce the number of entries that would compete at the main contest in Millstreet , Ireland.

Seven countries in Central and Eastern Europe looking to take part for the first time competed in Kvalifikacija za Millstreet English: Preselection for Millstreet , held in Ljubljana , Slovenia one month before the contest, with the top three countries qualifying.

At the close of the voting, Bosnia and Herzegovina , Croatia and Slovenia , were chosen to head to Millstreet, meaning Estonia , Hungary , Romania and Slovakia would have to wait another year before being allowed to compete.

The bottom seven countries in were asked to miss out the following year, however as Italy and Luxembourg withdrew voluntarily, only the bottom five countries eventually missed the contest in Dublin , to be replaced by the four competing countries in Kvalifikacija za Millstreet that had missed out and new entries from Lithuania , Poland and Russia.

This system was used again in for qualification for the contest , but a new system was introduced for the contest. Primarily in an attempt to appease Germany, one of Eurovision's biggest markets and biggest financial contributors which would have otherwise been relegated under the previous system, the contest saw an audio-only qualification round held in the months before the contest in Oslo , Norway.

However Germany would be one of the seven countries to miss out, alongside Hungary, Romania, Russia, Denmark , Israel , and Macedonia , in what would have been their debut entry in the contest.

In the rules on country relegation were changed to exempt France, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom from relegation, giving them the automatic right to compete regardless of their five-year point average.

This group, as the highest-paying European Broadcasting Union members which significantly fund the contest each year, subsequently became known as the "Big Four" countries.

This rule was originally brought in to prevent the contest's biggest financial backers from being relegated, and therefore their financial contribution would have been missed; however, since the introduction of the semi-finals in , the "Big Five" now instead automatically qualify for the final along with the host country.

There is some debate around whether this status prejudices the countries' results in the contest, based on reported antipathy over their automatic qualification, as well as the potential disadvantage of having performed less time on the main stage because they have not had to compete in the semi-finals.

An influx of new countries for the contest forced the contest's Reference Group to rethink on how best to manage the still-growing number of countries looking to enter the contest for the first time.

As they deemed it not possible to eliminate 10 countries each year, for the contest the organisers placed an initial freeze on new applications while they found a solution to this problem.

In January , the EBU announced the introduction of a semi-final, expanding the contest into a two-day event from Following the performances and the voting window, the names of the 10 countries with the highest number of points, which would therefore qualify for the grand final, were announced at the end of the show, revealed in a random order by the contest's presenters.

The single semi-final continued to be held between and , however by , with over 40 countries competing in that year's contest in Helsinki , Finland, the semi-final featured 28 entries competing for 10 spots in the final.

The automatic finalists are also split between the two semi-finals for the purpose of determining which semi-final they are obligated to air and provide votes.

Full voting results from the semi-finals are withheld until after the grand final, whereupon they are published on the official Eurovision website.

On only one occasion has the contest seen multiple winners being declared in a single contest: in , four countries finished the contest with an equal number of votes; with the lack of a rule in place at the time to break a tie for first place, all four countries were declared winners.

The United Kingdom holds the record for the number of second place finishes, having come runner-up in the contest 15 times. The various competing countries have had varying degrees of success in the contest over the years.

Only two countries have won the contest in their first appearance: Switzerland , the winner of the first contest in ; and Serbia , which won the contest in in their first participation as an independent country, having previously competed as part of Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro in previous contests.

It is rare, but not impossible, for a country to record back-to-back wins. In the contest's history this has occurred on four occasions: Spain became the first country to do so, when they was declared the winners of the contest and one of the four shared winners in ; Luxembourg was the first to do so without sharing the title, when they won the contest in and ; Israel did likewise in and ; and Ireland became the first country to win three consecutive titles, winning the contest in , and A number of countries have had relatively short waits before winning their first contest: Ukraine won on their second appearance in , while Latvia won in their third contest in Greece set the record for the longest wait for a win in the contest in , when Elena Paparizou won the contest 31 years after Greece's first appearance; the following year Finland broke this record, when Lordi ended a year losing streak for the Nordic country.

Many countries have also had to wait many years to win the contest again. Switzerland went 32 years before winning the contest for a second time in ; Denmark held a year gap between wins in and , and the Netherlands waited 44 years to win the contest again in , their most recent win having been in The majority of the winning songs have been performed at the contest in English , particularly since the language rule was abolished in Since that contest, only five winnings songs have been performed either fully or partially in a language other than English.

In winning the contest, the artists and songwriters receive a trophy, which since has featured a standard design. This trophy is a handmade piece of sandblasted glass with painted details in the shape of a s-style microphone , and was designed by Kjell Engman of Swedish-based Kosta Boda , who specialise in glass art.

Winning performers from the Eurovision Song Contest feature as some of the world's best-selling artists , while a number of the contest's winning songs have went to become some of the best-selling singles globally.

ABBA , the winners of the contest for Sweden, have sold an estimated million albums and singles since their contest win propelled them to worldwide fame, with their winning song " Waterloo " having sold over five million records.

Dana , Ireland's winner at the contest with " All Kinds of Everything ", went on to serve as a Member of the European Parliament and ran unsuccessfully in two Irish presidential elections.

Just a Little Bit ", which originally came eighth in the contest for the United Kingdom, reached 1 on the UK Singles Chart the last Eurovision song to achieve this as of [update] and achieved success across Europe and the US, selling , records and peaking at 12 on the Billboard Hot Johnny Logan remains the only artist to have won multiple Eurovision titles as a performer, winning the contest for Ireland in with " What's Another Year ", written by Shay Healy , and in with " Hold Me Now ", written by Logan himself.

Logan was also the winning songwriter at the contest when he wrote another Irish winner, " Why Me? Besides the song contest itself, the television broadcast regularly features performances from artists and musicians which are not competing in the contest, as may also include appearances from local and international personalities.

Previous winners of the contest also regularly feature, with the reigning champion traditionally returning to perform last year's winning song, as well as sometimes performing a new song from their repertoire.

The interval act, held after the final competing song has been performed and before the announcement of each country's votes, has become a memorable part of the contest and has featured both internationally-known artists and local stars.

The first public appearance of Riverdance was as part of the Eurovision Song Contest interval at the contest held in Dublin , Ireland; the seven-minute performance featuring traditional Irish music and dance was later expanded into a full stage show that has since been performed at over venues worldwide and seen by over 25 million people, becoming one of the most successful dance productions in the world and a launchpad for its lead dancers Michael Flatley and Jean Butler.

Recent contests have seen a number of world-renowned artists take to the Eurovision stage in non-competitive performances: Danish Europop group Aqua performed a music medley, which included their worldwide hit " Barbie Girl ", at the contest held in Copenhagen , Denmark; [] [] Russian duo t.

Guest performances in the contest's history have also been used as a channel and response to global events happening at the same time as the contest.

The contest in Jerusalem closed with the contest's presenters inviting all competing acts onto the stage to sing a rendition of the English version of " Hallelujah ", the Israeli winning song from , as a tribute to the victims of the ongoing war in the Balkans.

The contest has featured guest appearances from well-known faces from outside the world of music. At the same contest, Elton John made a guest appearance, speaking with the presenters live from the Life Ball in Vienna.

A number of new features to the contest have been added in recent years. Since , the tradition of opening the Grand Final with a "Parade of Nations", also called a "Flag Parade", has been established, which sees the competing artists entering the stage behind their country's flag in the order in which each country will perform, similar to the procession of competing athletes at the Olympic Games opening ceremony.

Several special broadcasts have been commissioned over the years to mark important anniversaries in the contest's history.

These broadcasts have featured both competitive and non-competitive formats, and typically consist of performances by past winners and artists as well as other memorable moments seen in previous contests.

The EBU has organised four special shows as of [update] in collaboration with member broadcasters, which have been broadcast through its networks.

Individual broadcasters have also commissioned their own shows for their audiences, which may or may not feature a voting element.

Several alternative programmes were commissioned by broadcasters following the cancellation of the contest, with Austria , Germany , Sweden and the United Kingdom among the countries to organise shows for their audiences.

Songs of Europe was an event held to celebrate the contest's twenty-fifth anniversary, held during the summer of in Mysen , Norway, as part of Momarkedet, an annual charity concert held at Mysen's Momarken racecourse and organised by the Mysen Red Cross.

Broadcast live to 31 countries which had taken part in the Eurovision Song Contest up to , the winner was crowned by the combined votes of juries and the viewing public through televoting over two rounds: in the first round, the number of competing songs was reduced to five, with each country giving points to their top 10 songs through the standard Eurovision voting system; in the second round, the winner was declared following a second round of voting, where only six points and above were given out.

Alongside the competition, the programme also featured highlights from Eurovision Song Contest history, special performances from former participants, and video medleys from past contests.

The non-competitive concert featured the participation of 15 past Eurovision artists from 13 countries, performing songs from the history of the contest, alongside video montages of several other Eurovision songs and behind-the-scenes footage of historical contests featured in-between the on-stage performances.

The programme provided a showcase for the 41 songs which would have competed at the 65th Eurovision Song Contest in a non-competitive format, and was hosted by Chantal Janzen , Edsilia Rombley and Jan Smit , with NikkieTutorials providing online content.

The two-hour long show also included appearances from past Eurovision artists connecting remotely with those in the Hilversum studio via live video linkups and through pre-recorded footage, including the most recent winner Duncan Laurence , who performed on location in Hilversum.

In the final performance of the evening, the artists of Eurovision came together as a virtual choir to perform " Love Shine a Light ", the winning song of the contest for the United Kingdom.

The contest has been the subject of criticism regarding both its musical contest and what some believe to be a political element to the contest, and several controversial moments have been witnessed over the course of its history.

Given the international nature of the contest and the diverse musical tastes of the viewing public, in many cases competing artists and songwriters will attempt to appeal to as many of these voters as possible with regards to their competing songs.

This has led to some criticism that the music on offer from the participating entries is formulaic, with certain music styles seen as being presented more often than others, with power ballads , folk rhythms and bubblegum pop being considered staples of the contest in recent years.

Although many of these traits are ridiculed in the media and elsewhere, for some these traits are celebrated and considered an integral part of what makes the contest appealing.

As artists and songs ultimately represent a country, the contest has seen several controversial moments where political tensions between competing countries as a result of frozen conflicts and, in some cases open warfare, are reflected in the contest's performances and voting.

The continuing conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan has affected the contest on numerous occasions since both countries begun competing in the late s.

In a number of people in Azerbaijan who voted for the Armenian were reportedly questioned by Azeri police. Interactions between Russia and Ukraine in the contest had originally been positive in the first years of co-competition, however as political relations soured between the two countries following the Russian annexation of Crimea in and the prolonged conflict in Eastern Ukraine , so too have relations at Eurovision become more complex.

In , Ukraine's Jamala won the contest with the song " ", whose lyrics referenced the deportation of the Crimean Tatars. Given the recent events in Crimea, many saw this song as a political statement against Russia's actions, however the song was permitted to compete given the largely historical nature of the song despite protests from Russia.

Requests by the contest's organisers for the lyrics of the song to be changed were refused by the group, and Georgian broadcaster GPB subsequenty withdrew from the event.

The contest has long been accused of what has been described as "political voting": a perception that countries will give votes more frequently and in higher quantities to other countries based on political relationships, rather than the musical merits of the songs themselves.

With the introduction of a second semi-final in , and to mitigate some of the aspects of bloc voting, the EBU introduced a system which splits countries between the two semi-finals.

Based on research into televoting patterns in previous contests, countries are placed into pots with other countries that share similar voting histories, and a random draw distributes the countries in each pot across the two semi-finals, meaning that countries which traditionally award points to each other are separated.

The contest has had a long-held fan base in the LGBT community , and Eurovision organisers have actively worked to include these fans since the s.

In more recent years, various political ideologies across Europe have clashed in the Eurovision setting, particularly on LGBT rights.

Turkey, once a regular participant in the contest and a one-time winner, first pulled out of the contest in , citing dissatisfaction in the voting rules; more recently when asked about returning to the contest Turkish broadcaster TRT have cited LGBT performances as another reason for their continued boycott.

Following the introduction of a "gay propaganda" law in Russia in , as well as developments in Ukraine , the contest saw a marked increase in the amount of booing , particularly during the Russian performance and during the voting when Russia received points.

Clashes on LGBT visibility in the contest have also occurred in countries which do not compete in the contest. Eurovision had been broadcast in China for several years, however in , the rights held by Mango TV were terminated during the contest.

Israel first competed in the contest in , becoming the first Middle Eastern country and the first country from outside of Europe to enter.

Its participation in the contest over the years has been at times controversial, but it has remained a regular competitor in the contest and been crowned the winner on four occasions.

The country's first appearance was marked by an increased security presence at the contest venue in Luxembourg City than what would have been considered normal in the early s, coming less than a year after the Munich massacre where 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team were killed by Palestinian terrorists.

Armed guards were stationed at the venue, and the audience in attendance were warned not to stand during the show at the risk of being shot. The contest was regularly broadcast in the Arab world during the s, however as many of these countries did not recognise Israel , their broadcasters typically cut to advertisements when Israel performed.

Israel's participation in the contest means that many Arab states that are eligible to participate in the contest choose not to do so, however a number of attempts have been made by some of the countries to enter.

Tunisia had applied to take part in the contest , and had been drawn to perform 4th on stage, but later withdrew.

The broadcaster therefore withdrew their entry, resulting in sanctions from the EBU due to the late withdrawal. Israel has hosted the contest on three occasions, and due to the preparations and rehearsals which accompany the contest, and the Saturday evening timeslot for the grand final, objections from Orthodox religious leaders in the country regarding the potential interruption to the Sabbath have been raised on all three occasions.

In these objections were largely ignored and preparations for the contest were held mostly unchanged from standard, however Turkey was pressured into withdrawing from the contest by Arab states who objected to a predominantly Muslim country taking part in Israel.

However all of these criticisms were in vain and the contest went ahead as planned in Jerusalem. Most recently, in , a number of controversial incidents occurred in the run-up to that year's contest in Tel Aviv.

Requests were once again received from Orthodox leaders that the contest not interfere with the Sabbath, with a letter penned by Yaakov Litzman , leader of the ultra-Othodox United Torah Judaism party, to several government departments demanding that the contest now violate the holy day.

The Eurovision Song Contest has amassed a global following and sees annual audience figures of between million and million.

The contest has a large online following, and multiple independent websites, news blogs and fan clubs are dedicated to the contest.

One of the oldest and largest Eurovision fan clubs is OGAE , founded in in Finland and currently a network of over 40 national branches across the world.

National branches regularly host events to promote and celebrate Eurovision, and several participating broadcasters work closely with these branches when preparing their entries.

In the run-up to each year's contest, several countries regularly host smaller events between the conclusion of the national selection shows and the contest proper; these events typically feature the artists which will go on to compete at the contest, and consist of performances at a venue and "meet and greets" with fans and the press.

With the cancellation of the contest in due to the COVID pandemic and the cancellation of many of the pre-contest events, a fan initiative to bring Eurovision fans together during the resulting lockdowns introduced in many European countries resulted in EurovisionAgain , created by journalist and Eurovision fan Rob Holley, where fans watched old contests in sync via YouTube and contributed to discussions via Twitter as the contest unfolded, with online voting held to choose a winner.

The hashtag regularly became a top trend on Twitter across Europe with each edition, and soon caught the attention of Eurovision organisers, who began to broadcast the contests through their official YouTube channel, and European news organisations soon also began to report on this fan initiative.

The contest is regularly reported in worldwide media, including in countries which do not take part in the contest, and has been broadcast across the globe, with past editions of the contest having aired in Canada, China, Kazakhstan, New Zealand and the United States.

As a result of the contest's popularity, a number of spin-offs and imitators have been developed and produced over the years, on both a national and international level.

The European Broadcasting Union has organised a number of related contests which focus on other aspects of music and culture, as part of their "Eurovision Live Events" brand.

First held in , Eurovision Young Dancers is a biennial dance competition for non-professional performers between the ages of 16 and Eurovision Young Musicians is a biennial classical music competition for European musicians between the ages of 12 and 21, first held in The Junior Eurovision Song Contest is considered the Eurovision Song Contest's "little brother", with singers aged between 9 and 14 representing primarily European countries.

The winning song is then decided by national juries and the viewing public through internet voting. In all, 17 contests have been organised since its first broadcast, with 39 countries having competed at least once.

Eurovision Choir is a biennial choral competition for non-professional European choirs produced in partnership between the EBU and Interkultur and modelled after the World Choir Games.

First held in and held as part of the European Choir Games, the contest sees choirs perform an unaccompanied choral set, with a three-member jury panel crowning a winner.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the most recent contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For the upcoming contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For other uses of "Eurovision", see Eurovision disambiguation.

Annual song competition held among member countries of the European Broadcasting Union. Eurovision ESC. Further information: History of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Umgekehrt müsste sie alle Kosten selber tragen, die in Verbindung mit dem Song Contest stehen, selbst das Visum für Israel.

Am Abend des Als endgültiger Grund wurde angegeben, dass durch die Politisierung der Vorentscheidung ein Konflikt nicht umgangen werden könne.

Hierbei handelt es sich um ein möglichen Zählfehler des italienischen Televotings. Vom italienischen Fernsehsender Rai wurden die Televotingergebnisse der italienischen Zuschauer im Finale sowie im zweiten Halbfinale in Prozent veröffentlicht.

Ein Verantwortlicher des italienischen Senders bestätigte, dass die Angaben von Rai richtig sind. Da Litauen eine höhere Punktzahl von den Zuschauern erhalten hat, hätte sich Litauen und nicht Dänemark für das Finale qualifiziert.

Zwei Mal sei das Bild schwarz geworden und nachdem das Bild wieder zu sehen war, sah man den Kameramann. Sollten die Bildstörungen tatsächlich das Jury-Ergebnis negativ beeinflusst haben, könne dies so Norwegen den Sieg gekostet haben.

Zu einer Zusage kam es jedoch nicht. Eurovision Song Contest. Bewerberstädte: Erfolgreiche Bewerbung, Erfolglose Bewerberstädte. PDF 7. Mai , abgerufen am 8.

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Mai hebräisch. In: timeout. Mai il. In: globes. Juni , abgerufen am August , abgerufen am August englisch.

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Januar In: escxtra. In: eurovisionworld. November , abgerufen am November englisch. Abgerufen am Dezember Januar , abgerufen am Januar englisch.

In: Eurovision. April März , abgerufen am März englisch. Oktober , abgerufen am Oktober englisch. Abgerufen am 7. Februar , abgerufen am Februar englisch.

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In: yerkirmedia. Mai armenisch. In: sbs. In: songfestival. April niederländisch. In: dr. Mai dänisch. In: yle. April finnisch. In: eurovision-fr.

März französisch. In: rte. Mai , abgerufen am 6. In: ruv. Mai isländisch. Oktober italienisch. In: tv.

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Jedes Land verteilt zwei Punktesätze bestehend aus 1—8, 10 und 12 Punkten an die zehn besten Lieder bzw.

Dabei stammt der erste Punktesatz von der Jury, der zweite vom Televoting der Zuschauer des jeweiligen Landes. Tel Aviv. Petach Tikwa. Die Austragungsorte hätten bei einem Zuschlag mit einem temporären Dach überdacht werden müssen.

Die Städte verfügen über keinen geeigneten Austragungsort. Hätte die jeweilige Stadt den Zuschlag für die Ausrichtung erhalten, wäre ein Neubau oder zumindest ein temporäres Gebäude nötig gewesen.

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Serbien Serbien. Belgien Belgien. Georgien Georgien. Australien Australien. Island Island. Estland Estland. Portugal Portugal. Griechenland Griechenland.

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Eurovision Song Contest Sieger Video

All winners of the Eurovision Song Contest (1956-2019) Based on the Sanremo Stargames Abzocker Festival held in Italy sinceEurovision Mybet Casino Gratis been held every year sincewith the exception of the cancelled editionmaking it the longest-running annual international televised music competition. In: srf. Rehearsals at the contest venue typically commence on the Sunday two weeks before the grand final, and all participating countries will rehearse individually on stage twice. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. In: yle. First held inEurovision Young Dancers is a biennial dance competition for non-professional performers between the ages of 16 and

Eurovision Song Contest Sieger Eurovision Song Contest: Deutschlands Erfolge und Niederlagen

Von bisund waren Norsk Casino Guide dann wieder einzelne Frauen; von bissowie von bis wurde, mit der Ausnahme vonwieder ein Zweiergespann aus einem Mann und einer Frau eingesetzt. Eurovision Choir. Die Niederlande hatten früher immer Slot Lucky Games Vorentscheid zur Bestimmung des Beitrags benutzt. Hierbei hatte jede Stimme die gleiche Gewichtung. Mai, um Quiz starten. Maiabgerufen Cric 5. The Economist. Tel Aviv kündigte Freecell Solitaire Kostenlos, Proben während des Sabbats zuzulassen. BBC News. Nordmazedonien Nordmazedonien.

Eurovision Song Contest Sieger - Eurovision Song Contest: Sieger

Portugal dagegen erreichte diesen nur zwei Mal. Die Punkte der Telefonabstimmung aus den Ländern werden addiert und diese Gesamtpunktzahl von den Moderatoren der Sendung verkündet. Mai , abgerufen am Zuvor wurden sie allerdings mit nur einem Prozentpunkt vor Carolin Fortenbacher Hinterm Ozean in der deutschen Vorentscheidung zum Finalteilnehmer gewählt. Wembley Conference Centre. Um die Dauer der Veranstaltung nicht ausufern zu lassen, musste die EBU die Zahl der Teilnehmer begrenzen, es konnten also nicht mehr alle Länder jedes Jahr teilnehmen. Oktober Regeländerungen vor: [22] Ab wurden zwei getrennte Halbfinale veranstaltet, über deren Zusammenstellungen man per Los entschied.

Eligibility to participate in the contest is therefore not limited to countries in Europe, as several countries geographically outside the boundaries of the continent and those which span more than one continent are included in the Broadcasting Area.

EBU Members who wish to participate must fulfil conditions as laid down by the rules of the contest, a separate copy of which is drafted annually.

A maximum of 44 countries can take part in any one contest. Fifty-two countries have participated at least once. Preparations for each year's contest typically begin following the conclusion of the previous year's contest.

At the winner's press conference following the grand final, the contest's Executive Supervisor will traditionally provide the winning country's Head of Delegation with a welcome package containing information related to hosting the contest.

Once the participating broadcaster of the winning country confirms to the EBU that they intend to host the event, a host city is chosen by the broadcaster, which should meet certain criteria set out in the contest's rules.

The host venue must be able to accommodate at least 10, spectators, space for a press centre for 1, journalists, and the host city should be within easy reach of an international airport.

In addition, the location must also have hotel accommodation available for at least 2, delegates, journalists and spectators.

In recent years, bid processes have become a common occurrence, with a number of cities in the host country applying to host the contest.

The contest has been hosted in a variety of different venues, from small theatres and television studios in the early days of the contest, to large stadiums in the present day.

The hotel and press facilities in the vicinity of the venue, and in particular the accommodation costs for the visiting delegations, journalists and fans, are typically an important consideration when choosing a host city.

The contest is considered to be a unique opportunity for promoting the host country as a tourist destination; ahead of the contest in Kiev , Ukraine, visa restrictions were lifted for European Union member countries and Switzerland through the summer of in a bid to encourage travel to Ukraine.

Following the first two contests hosted in Switzerland and Germany, the tradition of the winning country hosting the following year's event was established in , held in the Netherlands.

These exceptions are listed below: [13]. With Australia 's invitation to participate in the contest in , it was announced that should they win the contest, Australian broadcaster SBS would co-host the following year's contest in a European city in collaboration with an EBU Member Broadcaster of their choice.

A generic logo for the contest was first introduced in , to create a consistent visual identity. This is typically accompanied by unique theme artwork and a slogan designed for each individual contest by the host broadcaster, with the flag of the host country featuring in the centre of the Eurovision heart.

An individual slogan has been associated with each edition of the contest since , except in The "event weeks" refer to the weeks during which the contest takes place; the week in which the live shows are held and broadcast is typically referred to as "Eurovision week" by fans and the media.

For this reason the contest organisers will typically request that the venue be available for approximately six weeks before the contest's grand final.

Delegations will typically arrive in the host city two to three weeks before the live shows, with the "event weeks" in the host city typically lasting for 15 days.

Each participating broadcaster nominates a Head of Delegation, responsible for coordinating the movements of the delegate members, ensuring that the rules of the contest are respected by their delegation, and being that country's representative to the EBU.

Rehearsals at the contest venue typically commence on the Sunday two weeks before the grand final, and all participating countries will rehearse individually on stage twice.

Each country's first rehearsal lasts for 30 minutes and is held behind closed doors, with accredited press having no access to the venue but able to follow the rehearsals via a video-link to the nearby press centre.

These are then followed by a "meet and greet", with the participants meeting with press and fans in the press centre. The second rehearsal for each country lasts for 20 minutes, with press being able to watch from the arena.

This is then followed by a press conference with assembled press. After each country has rehearsed, the delegation meets with the show's production team in the viewing room, where they watch the footage of the rehearsal just performed and where the producers or delegations make known any special requirements or changes which are needed.

A summary of the questions and answers which emerge from the press conferences is produced by the host press office and distributed to the accredited press.

The typical schedule for these individual rehearsals sees the semi-finalists conducting their first rehearsal from the first Sunday through to the following Wednesday, with countries typically rehearsing in the order in which they will perform during the live semi-finals.

The semi-finalists' second rehearsals then usually take place from the Thursday to the Saturday in the week before the live shows. The delegations from the host country and the "Big Five" automatic finalists will arrive later, and typically hold their first rehearsal on the Friday or Saturday before "Eurovision week", and the second rehearsal on the Sunday.

Each live show is preceded by three dress rehearsals, where the whole show is performed in the same way as it will be presented on TV.

The first dress rehearsal, held during the afternoon of the day before the live show, is open to the press. The second and third dress rehearsals, held the night before the contest and during the afternoon on the day, are open to the public, with tickets being sold in the same way as for the live shows.

In addition, the second dress rehearsal is also used for a recorded back-up in case of technological failure, and is also the show on which the juries will base their votes.

A number of receptions and parties are typically held during the "event weeks", held by the contest organisers as well as by the various delegations.

Traditionally, a Welcome Reception is held on the Sunday preceding the live shows, which features a red carpet ceremony for all the participating countries.

This is typically held at an opulent venue in the host city, with grand theatres and city halls having featured at recent contests, and is usually accompanied by live music, complimentary food and drink and a fireworks display.

Accredited delegates, press and fans have access to an official nightclub , the "EuroClub", during the "events week", which is not open to the public.

In addition to the main Eurovision title, other prizes have traditionally been bestowed, both by the Eurovision organisers and by fan organisations.

The winners of these three awards will typically receive a trophy, which is traditionally handed out backstage shortly before the grand final.

A detailed set of rules is produced for each contest, written by the European Broadcasting Union and approved by the contest's Reference Group. These rules have changed over time, and typically outline the eligibility of the competing songs, the contest's format, the voting system to be used to determine the winner and how the results will be presented, the values of the contest to which all participating broadcasters must agree, and distribution and broadcasting rights for both broadcasters participating in the contest and those which do not or cannot enter.

The contest is organised annually by the European Broadcasting Union EBU , together with the participating broadcaster of the host country. The contest is overseen by the Reference Group on behalf of all participating broadcasters, who are each represented by a nominated Head of Delegation.

The Head of Delegation for each country is responsible for leading their country's delegation at the event, and is their country's contact person with the EBU.

A country's delegation will typically include a Head of Press, the contest participants, the songwriters and composers, backing performers, and the artist's entourage, and can range from 20 to 50 people depending on the country.

Since the first editions of the contest, the contest's voting procedure has been presided over by a scrutineer nominated by the EBU, who is responsible for ensuring that all points are allocated correctly and in turn.

This has evolved into the present-day role of the Executive Supervisor, who along with overseeing the voting is also responsible for ensuring the organisation of the contest on behalf of the EBU, enforcing the rules and overseeing the TV production during the live shows.

The Reference Group is the contest's executive committee and works on behalf of all participating countries in the contest.

The group meets four to five times a year on behalf of all participating broadcasters, and its role is to approve the development and format of the contest, secure financing, control the contest's branding, raise public awareness, and to oversee the yearly preparations of the contest with the host broadcaster.

The rules of the contest set out which songs may be eligible to compete. As the contest is for new compositions, and in order to prevent any one competing entry from having an advantage compared to the other entries, the contest organisers typically set a restriction on when a song may be released to be considered eligible.

The contest has never had a rule in place dictating the nationality or country of birth of the competing artists; many smaller competing countries, such as Luxembourg and Monaco , were regularly represented by artists and composers from other countries, and several winning artists in the contest's history have held a different nationality or were born in a different country to that which they represented in the contest.

Each competing performance may only feature a maximum of six people on stage, and may not contain live animals.

Live music has been an integral part of the contest since its first edition. The main vocals of the competing songs must be sung live on stage, however other rules on pre-recorded musical accompaniment have changed over time.

The orchestra was a prominent feature of the contest from to Pre-recorded backing tracks were first allowed in the contest in , but under this rule the only instruments which could be pre-recorded had to also be seen being "performed" on stage; in , this rule was changed to allow all instrumental music to be pre-recorded, however the host country was still required to provide an orchestra.

Before , all vocals were required to be performed live, with no natural voices of any kind or vocal imitations allowed on backing tracks. As Eurovision is a song contest, all competing entries must include vocals and lyrics of some kind; purely instrumental pieces have never been allowed.

From to , there were no rules in place to dictate which language a country may perform in, however all entries up to were performed in one of their countries' national languages.

In , Sweden's Ingvar Wixell broke with this tradition to perform his song in English, " Absent Friend ", which had originally been performed at the Swedish national final in Swedish.

The language rule was first abolished in , allowing all participating countries to sing in the language of their choice; [] [] the rule was reintroduced ahead of the contest , however as the process for choosing the entries for Belgium and Germany had already begun before the rule change, they were permitted to perform in English.

Since the abolition of the language rule, the large majority of entries at each year's contest are now performed in English, given its status as a lingua franca ; at the contest , only four songs were performed in a language other than English.

However at the contest , following Salvador Sobral 's victory with a song in Portuguese , that year's contest marked an increased number of entries in another language than English, which was repeated again in The abolition of the language rule has, however, provided opportunities for artists to perform songs which would not have been possible previously.

A number of competing entries have been performed in an invented language: in , Urban Trad came second for Belgium with the song " Sanomi "; in , Treble represented the Netherlands with " Amambanda ", performed in both English and an artificial language; and in , Ishtar represented Belgium with " O Julissi ".

As the contest is presented in both English and French, at least one of the contest's hosts must be able to speak French as well as English. The order in which the competing countries perform had historically been decided through a random draw, however since the order has been decided by the contest's producers, and submitted to the EBU Executive Supervisor and Reference Group for approval before being announced publicly.

This change was introduced in order to provide a better experience for television viewers, making the show more exciting and allowing all countries to stand out by avoiding cases where songs of similar style or tempo were performed in sequence.

The process change in led to a mixed reaction from fans of the contests, with some expressing concern over potential corruption in allowing the producers to decide at which point each country would perform, while others were more optimistic about the change.

Various voting system have been used in the contest's history to determine the placing of the competing songs. The current system has been in place since , which works on the basis of positional voting.

Each set of points consists of 1—8, 10 and 12 points to the jury and public's 10 favourite songs, with the most preferred song receiving 12 points.

Historically, each country's points were determined by a jury, which has at times consisted of members of the public, music professionals, or both in combination.

The current voting system is a modification of that used in the contest since , when the "1—8, 10, 12 points" system was first introduced.

Until , each country provided one set of points, representing the votes of either the country's jury, public or, since the grand final, the votes of both combined.

Since , each country's votes have been announced as part of a voting segment of the contest's broadcast. After each country's votes have been calculated and verified, and following performances during the interval, the presenter s of the contest will call upon a spokesperson in each country in turn to invite them to announce the results of their country's vote in English or French.

The votes from each country are tallied via a scoreboard , which typically shows the total number of points each country has so far received, as well as the points being given out by the country currently being called upon by the presenter s.

The scoreboard was first introduced in ; voting at the first contest was held behind closed doors, but taking inspiration from the UK's Festival of British Popular Songs which featured voting by regional juries, the EBU decided to incorporate this idea into its own contest.

Historically, each country's spokesperson would announce all points being given out in sequence, which would then be repeated by the contest's presenter s in both English and French.

With the increase in the number of competing countries, and therefore the number of countries voting in the final, the voting sequence soon became a lengthy process.

From , in order to save time, only each country's 8, 10 and 12 points were announced by their spokesperson, with points automatically added to the scoreboard.

From to , the order in which the participating countries announced their votes was in reverse order of the presentation of their songs; from to , countries were called upon in the same order in which they presented their songs, with the exception of the contest, where a drawing of lots was used to decide the order in which countries were called upon.

This order is based upon the jury results submitted after the "jury final" dress rehearsal the day before the grand final, in order to create a more suspenseful experience for the viewing public.

Since , when the votes of each country's jury and public are announced separately, the voting presentation begins with each country's spokespersons being called upon in turn to announce the points of their country's professional jury.

Once the jury points from all countries have been announced, the contest's presenter s will then announce the total public points received for each finalist, with the results of all countries consolidated into a single value for each participating country.

Since , the rules of the contest outline how to determine the winning country in cases where two or more countries have the same number of points at the end of the voting.

The method of breaking a tie has changed over time, and the current tie-break rule has been in place since In this event, a combined national televoting and jury result is calculated for each country, and the winner is the song which has obtained points from the highest number of countries.

The first tie-break rule was introduced following the contest, when four of the sixteen countries taking part—France, Spain, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom—all finished the voting with an equal number of votes.

As of [update] , on only one occasion since has there been a tie for first place: in , at the end of the voting procedure both Sweden and France had received points each.

The tie-breaking rule in place at the time specified that the country which had received the most sets of 12 points would be declared the winner; if there was still a tie, then the 10 points received, followed by 8 points, etc.

Both France and Sweden had received four sets of 12 points, however as Sweden had received more individual 10 points than France, Sweden's Carola was declared the winner.

A number of steps have been established to ensure that a valid voting result is obtained and that transparency in the vote and results is observed.

Each country's professional jury, as well as the individual jury members, must meet a set criteria to be eligible, regarding professional background, and diversity in gender and age.

A set criteria is outlined against which the competing entries should be evaluated against, and all jury members pledge in writing that they will use this criteria when ranking the entries, as well as stating that they are not connected to any of the contestants in any way that could influence their decision.

Additionally, jury members may only sit on a jury once every three years. Each jury member votes independently of the other members of the jury, and no discussion or deliberation about the vote between members is permitted.

Since , the televoting in each country has been overseen by the contest's official voting partner, the German-based Digame.

This company gathers all televotes and, since , jury votes in all countries, which are then processed by the company's Pan-European Response Platform, based out of their Voting Control Centre in Cologne , Germany.

This system ensures that all votes are counted in accordance with the rules, and that any attempts to unfairly influence the vote are detected and mitigated.

Participating broadcasters from competing countries are required to air live the semi-final in which they compete, or in the case of the automatic finalists the semi-final in which they are required to vote, and the grand final, in its entirety, including all competing songs, the voting recap which contains short clips of the performances, the voting procedure or semi-final qualification reveal, and in the grand final the reprise of the winning song.

The contest was first produced in colour in , and has been broadcast in widescreen since , and in high-definition since An archiving project was initiated by the EBU in , aiming to collate footage from all editions of the contest and related materials from its history ahead of the contest's 60th anniversary in The first contest in was primarily a radio show, however cameras were present to broadcast the show for the few Europeans who had a television set; any video footage which may have been recorded has since been lost over time, however audio of the contest has been preserved and a short newsreel of the winning reprise has survived.

The copyright of each individual contest from to is held by the organising host broadcaster for that year's contest. Since , the rights to each contest are now held centrally by the EBU.

From the original seven countries which entered the first contest in , the number of competing countries has steadily grown over time, with over 20 countries regularly competing by the late s.

The first discussions around modifying the contest's format to account for the growth in competing countries took place in the s.

In , with the contest now ten years old, the EBU invited participating broadcasters to share proposals for the future of the contest after the Luxembourgish broadcaster CLT expressed doubts about their ability to stage the contest.

Besides slight modifications to the voting system in use and other rules, no fundamental changes to the contest's format were introduced until the early s, when changes in Europe in the late s and early s saw the formation of new countries and interest in the contest from countries in the former Eastern Bloc began to grow, particularly after the cessation of the Eastern European rival OIRT network and its merger with the EBU in To reduce this number, the contest organisers implemented a preselection method for the first time, to reduce the number of entries that would compete at the main contest in Millstreet , Ireland.

Seven countries in Central and Eastern Europe looking to take part for the first time competed in Kvalifikacija za Millstreet English: Preselection for Millstreet , held in Ljubljana , Slovenia one month before the contest, with the top three countries qualifying.

At the close of the voting, Bosnia and Herzegovina , Croatia and Slovenia , were chosen to head to Millstreet, meaning Estonia , Hungary , Romania and Slovakia would have to wait another year before being allowed to compete.

The bottom seven countries in were asked to miss out the following year, however as Italy and Luxembourg withdrew voluntarily, only the bottom five countries eventually missed the contest in Dublin , to be replaced by the four competing countries in Kvalifikacija za Millstreet that had missed out and new entries from Lithuania , Poland and Russia.

This system was used again in for qualification for the contest , but a new system was introduced for the contest.

Primarily in an attempt to appease Germany, one of Eurovision's biggest markets and biggest financial contributors which would have otherwise been relegated under the previous system, the contest saw an audio-only qualification round held in the months before the contest in Oslo , Norway.

However Germany would be one of the seven countries to miss out, alongside Hungary, Romania, Russia, Denmark , Israel , and Macedonia , in what would have been their debut entry in the contest.

In the rules on country relegation were changed to exempt France, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom from relegation, giving them the automatic right to compete regardless of their five-year point average.

This group, as the highest-paying European Broadcasting Union members which significantly fund the contest each year, subsequently became known as the "Big Four" countries.

This rule was originally brought in to prevent the contest's biggest financial backers from being relegated, and therefore their financial contribution would have been missed; however, since the introduction of the semi-finals in , the "Big Five" now instead automatically qualify for the final along with the host country.

There is some debate around whether this status prejudices the countries' results in the contest, based on reported antipathy over their automatic qualification, as well as the potential disadvantage of having performed less time on the main stage because they have not had to compete in the semi-finals.

An influx of new countries for the contest forced the contest's Reference Group to rethink on how best to manage the still-growing number of countries looking to enter the contest for the first time.

As they deemed it not possible to eliminate 10 countries each year, for the contest the organisers placed an initial freeze on new applications while they found a solution to this problem.

In January , the EBU announced the introduction of a semi-final, expanding the contest into a two-day event from Following the performances and the voting window, the names of the 10 countries with the highest number of points, which would therefore qualify for the grand final, were announced at the end of the show, revealed in a random order by the contest's presenters.

The single semi-final continued to be held between and , however by , with over 40 countries competing in that year's contest in Helsinki , Finland, the semi-final featured 28 entries competing for 10 spots in the final.

The automatic finalists are also split between the two semi-finals for the purpose of determining which semi-final they are obligated to air and provide votes.

Full voting results from the semi-finals are withheld until after the grand final, whereupon they are published on the official Eurovision website.

On only one occasion has the contest seen multiple winners being declared in a single contest: in , four countries finished the contest with an equal number of votes; with the lack of a rule in place at the time to break a tie for first place, all four countries were declared winners.

The United Kingdom holds the record for the number of second place finishes, having come runner-up in the contest 15 times. The various competing countries have had varying degrees of success in the contest over the years.

Only two countries have won the contest in their first appearance: Switzerland , the winner of the first contest in ; and Serbia , which won the contest in in their first participation as an independent country, having previously competed as part of Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro in previous contests.

It is rare, but not impossible, for a country to record back-to-back wins. In the contest's history this has occurred on four occasions: Spain became the first country to do so, when they was declared the winners of the contest and one of the four shared winners in ; Luxembourg was the first to do so without sharing the title, when they won the contest in and ; Israel did likewise in and ; and Ireland became the first country to win three consecutive titles, winning the contest in , and A number of countries have had relatively short waits before winning their first contest: Ukraine won on their second appearance in , while Latvia won in their third contest in Greece set the record for the longest wait for a win in the contest in , when Elena Paparizou won the contest 31 years after Greece's first appearance; the following year Finland broke this record, when Lordi ended a year losing streak for the Nordic country.

Many countries have also had to wait many years to win the contest again. Switzerland went 32 years before winning the contest for a second time in ; Denmark held a year gap between wins in and , and the Netherlands waited 44 years to win the contest again in , their most recent win having been in The majority of the winning songs have been performed at the contest in English , particularly since the language rule was abolished in Since that contest, only five winnings songs have been performed either fully or partially in a language other than English.

In winning the contest, the artists and songwriters receive a trophy, which since has featured a standard design.

This trophy is a handmade piece of sandblasted glass with painted details in the shape of a s-style microphone , and was designed by Kjell Engman of Swedish-based Kosta Boda , who specialise in glass art.

Winning performers from the Eurovision Song Contest feature as some of the world's best-selling artists , while a number of the contest's winning songs have went to become some of the best-selling singles globally.

ABBA , the winners of the contest for Sweden, have sold an estimated million albums and singles since their contest win propelled them to worldwide fame, with their winning song " Waterloo " having sold over five million records.

Dana , Ireland's winner at the contest with " All Kinds of Everything ", went on to serve as a Member of the European Parliament and ran unsuccessfully in two Irish presidential elections.

Just a Little Bit ", which originally came eighth in the contest for the United Kingdom, reached 1 on the UK Singles Chart the last Eurovision song to achieve this as of [update] and achieved success across Europe and the US, selling , records and peaking at 12 on the Billboard Hot Johnny Logan remains the only artist to have won multiple Eurovision titles as a performer, winning the contest for Ireland in with " What's Another Year ", written by Shay Healy , and in with " Hold Me Now ", written by Logan himself.

Logan was also the winning songwriter at the contest when he wrote another Irish winner, " Why Me? Besides the song contest itself, the television broadcast regularly features performances from artists and musicians which are not competing in the contest, as may also include appearances from local and international personalities.

Previous winners of the contest also regularly feature, with the reigning champion traditionally returning to perform last year's winning song, as well as sometimes performing a new song from their repertoire.

The interval act, held after the final competing song has been performed and before the announcement of each country's votes, has become a memorable part of the contest and has featured both internationally-known artists and local stars.

The first public appearance of Riverdance was as part of the Eurovision Song Contest interval at the contest held in Dublin , Ireland; the seven-minute performance featuring traditional Irish music and dance was later expanded into a full stage show that has since been performed at over venues worldwide and seen by over 25 million people, becoming one of the most successful dance productions in the world and a launchpad for its lead dancers Michael Flatley and Jean Butler.

Recent contests have seen a number of world-renowned artists take to the Eurovision stage in non-competitive performances: Danish Europop group Aqua performed a music medley, which included their worldwide hit " Barbie Girl ", at the contest held in Copenhagen , Denmark; [] [] Russian duo t.

Guest performances in the contest's history have also been used as a channel and response to global events happening at the same time as the contest.

The contest in Jerusalem closed with the contest's presenters inviting all competing acts onto the stage to sing a rendition of the English version of " Hallelujah ", the Israeli winning song from , as a tribute to the victims of the ongoing war in the Balkans.

The contest has featured guest appearances from well-known faces from outside the world of music.

At the same contest, Elton John made a guest appearance, speaking with the presenters live from the Life Ball in Vienna. A number of new features to the contest have been added in recent years.

Since , the tradition of opening the Grand Final with a "Parade of Nations", also called a "Flag Parade", has been established, which sees the competing artists entering the stage behind their country's flag in the order in which each country will perform, similar to the procession of competing athletes at the Olympic Games opening ceremony.

Several special broadcasts have been commissioned over the years to mark important anniversaries in the contest's history.

These broadcasts have featured both competitive and non-competitive formats, and typically consist of performances by past winners and artists as well as other memorable moments seen in previous contests.

The EBU has organised four special shows as of [update] in collaboration with member broadcasters, which have been broadcast through its networks.

Individual broadcasters have also commissioned their own shows for their audiences, which may or may not feature a voting element.

Several alternative programmes were commissioned by broadcasters following the cancellation of the contest, with Austria , Germany , Sweden and the United Kingdom among the countries to organise shows for their audiences.

Songs of Europe was an event held to celebrate the contest's twenty-fifth anniversary, held during the summer of in Mysen , Norway, as part of Momarkedet, an annual charity concert held at Mysen's Momarken racecourse and organised by the Mysen Red Cross.

Broadcast live to 31 countries which had taken part in the Eurovision Song Contest up to , the winner was crowned by the combined votes of juries and the viewing public through televoting over two rounds: in the first round, the number of competing songs was reduced to five, with each country giving points to their top 10 songs through the standard Eurovision voting system; in the second round, the winner was declared following a second round of voting, where only six points and above were given out.

Alongside the competition, the programme also featured highlights from Eurovision Song Contest history, special performances from former participants, and video medleys from past contests.

The non-competitive concert featured the participation of 15 past Eurovision artists from 13 countries, performing songs from the history of the contest, alongside video montages of several other Eurovision songs and behind-the-scenes footage of historical contests featured in-between the on-stage performances.

The programme provided a showcase for the 41 songs which would have competed at the 65th Eurovision Song Contest in a non-competitive format, and was hosted by Chantal Janzen , Edsilia Rombley and Jan Smit , with NikkieTutorials providing online content.

The two-hour long show also included appearances from past Eurovision artists connecting remotely with those in the Hilversum studio via live video linkups and through pre-recorded footage, including the most recent winner Duncan Laurence , who performed on location in Hilversum.

In the final performance of the evening, the artists of Eurovision came together as a virtual choir to perform " Love Shine a Light ", the winning song of the contest for the United Kingdom.

The contest has been the subject of criticism regarding both its musical contest and what some believe to be a political element to the contest, and several controversial moments have been witnessed over the course of its history.

Given the international nature of the contest and the diverse musical tastes of the viewing public, in many cases competing artists and songwriters will attempt to appeal to as many of these voters as possible with regards to their competing songs.

This has led to some criticism that the music on offer from the participating entries is formulaic, with certain music styles seen as being presented more often than others, with power ballads , folk rhythms and bubblegum pop being considered staples of the contest in recent years.

Although many of these traits are ridiculed in the media and elsewhere, for some these traits are celebrated and considered an integral part of what makes the contest appealing.

As artists and songs ultimately represent a country, the contest has seen several controversial moments where political tensions between competing countries as a result of frozen conflicts and, in some cases open warfare, are reflected in the contest's performances and voting.

The continuing conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan has affected the contest on numerous occasions since both countries begun competing in the late s.

In a number of people in Azerbaijan who voted for the Armenian were reportedly questioned by Azeri police. Interactions between Russia and Ukraine in the contest had originally been positive in the first years of co-competition, however as political relations soured between the two countries following the Russian annexation of Crimea in and the prolonged conflict in Eastern Ukraine , so too have relations at Eurovision become more complex.

In , Ukraine's Jamala won the contest with the song " ", whose lyrics referenced the deportation of the Crimean Tatars.

Given the recent events in Crimea, many saw this song as a political statement against Russia's actions, however the song was permitted to compete given the largely historical nature of the song despite protests from Russia.

Requests by the contest's organisers for the lyrics of the song to be changed were refused by the group, and Georgian broadcaster GPB subsequenty withdrew from the event.

The contest has long been accused of what has been described as "political voting": a perception that countries will give votes more frequently and in higher quantities to other countries based on political relationships, rather than the musical merits of the songs themselves.

With the introduction of a second semi-final in , and to mitigate some of the aspects of bloc voting, the EBU introduced a system which splits countries between the two semi-finals.

Based on research into televoting patterns in previous contests, countries are placed into pots with other countries that share similar voting histories, and a random draw distributes the countries in each pot across the two semi-finals, meaning that countries which traditionally award points to each other are separated.

The contest has had a long-held fan base in the LGBT community , and Eurovision organisers have actively worked to include these fans since the s.

In more recent years, various political ideologies across Europe have clashed in the Eurovision setting, particularly on LGBT rights.

Turkey, once a regular participant in the contest and a one-time winner, first pulled out of the contest in , citing dissatisfaction in the voting rules; more recently when asked about returning to the contest Turkish broadcaster TRT have cited LGBT performances as another reason for their continued boycott.

Following the introduction of a "gay propaganda" law in Russia in , as well as developments in Ukraine , the contest saw a marked increase in the amount of booing , particularly during the Russian performance and during the voting when Russia received points.

Clashes on LGBT visibility in the contest have also occurred in countries which do not compete in the contest. Eurovision had been broadcast in China for several years, however in , the rights held by Mango TV were terminated during the contest.

Israel first competed in the contest in , becoming the first Middle Eastern country and the first country from outside of Europe to enter.

Its participation in the contest over the years has been at times controversial, but it has remained a regular competitor in the contest and been crowned the winner on four occasions.

The country's first appearance was marked by an increased security presence at the contest venue in Luxembourg City than what would have been considered normal in the early s, coming less than a year after the Munich massacre where 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team were killed by Palestinian terrorists.

Armed guards were stationed at the venue, and the audience in attendance were warned not to stand during the show at the risk of being shot.

The contest was regularly broadcast in the Arab world during the s, however as many of these countries did not recognise Israel , their broadcasters typically cut to advertisements when Israel performed.

Israel's participation in the contest means that many Arab states that are eligible to participate in the contest choose not to do so, however a number of attempts have been made by some of the countries to enter.

Tunisia had applied to take part in the contest , and had been drawn to perform 4th on stage, but later withdrew.

The broadcaster therefore withdrew their entry, resulting in sanctions from the EBU due to the late withdrawal. Israel has hosted the contest on three occasions, and due to the preparations and rehearsals which accompany the contest, and the Saturday evening timeslot for the grand final, objections from Orthodox religious leaders in the country regarding the potential interruption to the Sabbath have been raised on all three occasions.

In these objections were largely ignored and preparations for the contest were held mostly unchanged from standard, however Turkey was pressured into withdrawing from the contest by Arab states who objected to a predominantly Muslim country taking part in Israel.

However all of these criticisms were in vain and the contest went ahead as planned in Jerusalem. Most recently, in , a number of controversial incidents occurred in the run-up to that year's contest in Tel Aviv.

Requests were once again received from Orthodox leaders that the contest not interfere with the Sabbath, with a letter penned by Yaakov Litzman , leader of the ultra-Othodox United Torah Judaism party, to several government departments demanding that the contest now violate the holy day.

The Eurovision Song Contest has amassed a global following and sees annual audience figures of between million and million. The contest has a large online following, and multiple independent websites, news blogs and fan clubs are dedicated to the contest.

One of the oldest and largest Eurovision fan clubs is OGAE , founded in in Finland and currently a network of over 40 national branches across the world.

National branches regularly host events to promote and celebrate Eurovision, and several participating broadcasters work closely with these branches when preparing their entries.

In the run-up to each year's contest, several countries regularly host smaller events between the conclusion of the national selection shows and the contest proper; these events typically feature the artists which will go on to compete at the contest, and consist of performances at a venue and "meet and greets" with fans and the press.

With the cancellation of the contest in due to the COVID pandemic and the cancellation of many of the pre-contest events, a fan initiative to bring Eurovision fans together during the resulting lockdowns introduced in many European countries resulted in EurovisionAgain , created by journalist and Eurovision fan Rob Holley, where fans watched old contests in sync via YouTube and contributed to discussions via Twitter as the contest unfolded, with online voting held to choose a winner.

The hashtag regularly became a top trend on Twitter across Europe with each edition, and soon caught the attention of Eurovision organisers, who began to broadcast the contests through their official YouTube channel, and European news organisations soon also began to report on this fan initiative.

The contest is regularly reported in worldwide media, including in countries which do not take part in the contest, and has been broadcast across the globe, with past editions of the contest having aired in Canada, China, Kazakhstan, New Zealand and the United States.

As a result of the contest's popularity, a number of spin-offs and imitators have been developed and produced over the years, on both a national and international level.

The European Broadcasting Union has organised a number of related contests which focus on other aspects of music and culture, as part of their "Eurovision Live Events" brand.

First held in , Eurovision Young Dancers is a biennial dance competition for non-professional performers between the ages of 16 and Eurovision Young Musicians is a biennial classical music competition for European musicians between the ages of 12 and 21, first held in The Junior Eurovision Song Contest is considered the Eurovision Song Contest's "little brother", with singers aged between 9 and 14 representing primarily European countries.

The winning song is then decided by national juries and the viewing public through internet voting. In all, 17 contests have been organised since its first broadcast, with 39 countries having competed at least once.

Eurovision Choir is a biennial choral competition for non-professional European choirs produced in partnership between the EBU and Interkultur and modelled after the World Choir Games.

First held in and held as part of the European Choir Games, the contest sees choirs perform an unaccompanied choral set, with a three-member jury panel crowning a winner.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the most recent contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For the upcoming contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For other uses of "Eurovision", see Eurovision disambiguation.

Annual song competition held among member countries of the European Broadcasting Union. Ebenso gab es Änderungen in den Platzierungen und den Punktzahlen der Finalisten.

Juli stellte das israelische Fernsehen einen Anforderungskatalog an die potenzielle Gastgeberstadt vor: [6]. Nach Israels Sieg am Mai verkündete der israelische Ministerpräsident Benjamin Netanjahu auf seinem offiziellen Instagram-Account, dass der Eurovision Song Contest in Jerusalem stattfinden werde.

Bestätigt wurde allerdings schon von der Gemeinde Jerusalem, dass das Event definitiv nicht im Austragungsort des Eurovision Song Contests und , dem International Convention Center Jerusalem , stattfinden werde.

Juni revidiert. Auch wenn die Stadt keine geeignete Arena besitze, argumentierte der Bürgermeister damit, dass Aserbaidschan es in fünf Monaten geschafft habe, eine ganze Arena zu errichten.

Dementsprechend sollte das Petach Tikwa auch schaffen. KAN eröffnete den offiziellen Bewerbungsprozess für den Austragungsort am Juni Juli endete die Bewerbungsfrist für potenzielle Austragungsorte.

Eilat, Jerusalem und Tel Aviv haben eine Bewerbung eingereicht. Nach der Veröffentlichung der Kriterien für einen potenziellen Austragungsort galt Tel Aviv als favorisierter Austragungsort.

Ultraorthodoxe Parteien kündigten an, gegen Proben, die während des Sabbats in Jerusalem stattfinden sollten, zu votieren. Tel Aviv kündigte an, Proben während des Sabbats zuzulassen.

Die austragende Fernsehanstalt KAN musste bis zum Der Sender konnte laut eigener Angaben die geforderte Summe nicht alleine aufbringen und war auf Zahlungen der israelischen Regierung angewiesen.

Benjamin Netanjahu war zuletzt davon überzeugt, dass der Sender den Betrag aus den ihm zur Verfügung stehenden Millionen Euro selbst zahlen könne.

Wäre keine Einigung erzielt worden, hätten bei KAN bis zu Planstellen entfallen oder das eigene Programmangebot gekürzt werden müssen.

Das Eurovision Village dt. Insgesamt soll das Dorf neun Tage bestehen. Es lautet Dare To Dream! Das dazugehörige Logo wurde am 8.

Januar veröffentlicht. Es besteht aus drei Dreiecken, die zusammen einen Stern ergeben, der symbolisch für den Zusammenhalt steht. Dazu wird es das Logo in zwei weiteren Varianten geben, die auch in der Show zu sehen sein werden.

Das Hauptlogo soll allerdings hauptsächlich während der drei Sendungen präsent sein. Dabei schickte die Rundfunkanstalt Einladungen an sämtliche Bühnendesigner in Israel, allerdings konnten sich auch internationale Designer bewerben.

KAN stellte ebenfalls einige Bedingungen für das Bühnendesign Es soll ikonisch, einzigartig, innovativ und bahnbrechend sein.

Ebenfalls wird der Greenroom erwähnt, welcher sich erstmals seit dem ESC wieder an einem anderen Ort befinden wird.

Das Bühnendesign wurde, wie im Vorjahr, von Florian Wieder konzipiert. Er gestaltete auch das Bühnendesign für den deutschen Vorentscheid.

Israel war bereits ein Pionier, als erstmals zwei Frauen und ein Mann die Moderation übernommen haben. Dafür werden sich die Mitglieder eines Landes treffen und gemeinsam die Generalprobe der Shows anschauen.

Dabei soll dies jeder unabhängig von den anderen tun. In den deutschsprachigen Ländern sitzen folgende Juroren in der Jury: [30]. So sollten die Punkte des Televotings nicht aufsteigend nach der Anzahl vergeben werden, sondern nach der Platzierung des Landes im Juryvoting.

Wurde ein Land beispielsweise Letzter im Juryvoting, erhielt es zuerst seine Punktzahl vom Televoting, unabhängig davon, wie hoch sie war.

Bis zum Oktober hatte dann die jeweilige Fernsehanstalt, die das Teilnehmerland repräsentiert, noch Zeit, ihre Teilnahme ohne Strafe zurückzuziehen.

Lediglich Bulgarien sagte zu dem Zeitpunkt aus finanziellen Gründen seine Teilnahme ab und zog sich damit vom Wettbewerb zurück.

Erstmals seit dem ESC zog sich damit ein Land zurück, ohne dass ein anderes Land zurückkehrt oder debütiert. Damit hätten zum dritten Mal in vier Jahren 42 Länder teilgenommen.

Zuletzt meldeten sich 42 Länder für den Wettbewerb an. In den letzten drei Jahren meldeten sich jeweils immer 43 Länder an, um teilzunehmen. Das gleiche traf auch auf und zu.

Auch zog sich wieder ein Land vor dem Wettbewerb zurück. So gab die Ukraine am Februar bekannt, dass sie sich vom Wettbewerb zurückziehen werden, obwohl sie mit dem Widbir bereits eine Vorentscheidung abgehalten haben.

Somit nahmen erstmals 41 Länder teil. Zuvor nahmen entweder 42 oder 43 Länder teil oder weniger als Jurijus nahm bereits zum dritten Mal am Song Contest teil.

Zuvor war er als Backing-Sänger und tätig. Tamara dagegen nahm zum bereits vierten Mal am Song Contest teil. Zuvor vertrat sie Nordmazedonien als Hintergrundsängerin in den Jahren und Ebenfalls nahm Sergei Lasarew , ein weiterer Teilnehmer von , zum bereits zweiten Mal für Russland teil.

Er vertrat Ungarn zuvor und war damit der erste Teilnehmer Ungarns, der das Land mehr als einmal vertreten wird. Dort verpasste das Trio allerdings knapp das Finale.

Februar der Öffentlichkeit vorgestellt. Die deutsche Vorentscheidung Unser Lied für Israel fand am Februar statt.

Insgesamt sieben Interpreten nahmen daran teil. März vorgestellt. Die französischsprachige Fernsehanstalt RTS stellte am Es wurden Interpreten und Komponisten gesucht, mit denen der Sender über die nächsten Monate hinweg zusammenarbeitete.

Die Auswahl des Interpreten wurde stattdessen über eine Jury vorgenommen. Ähnlich wie beim deutschen Vorentscheid gab es eine köpfige internationale Jury sowie eine köpfige Zuschauer-Jury, die den Interpreten und seinen Beitrag intern auswählten.

Die köpfige internationale Jury bestand dabei aus ehemaligen Juroren des Eurovision Song Contests. Vom 1. September bis zum 1.

Insgesamt wurden Beiträge eingereicht. Gleichzeitig stellte RSI am September dreizehn Interpreten vor, die sich in einer engeren Auswahl für eine Wildcard befanden.

Die Zuschauer hatten bis zum Folgende Ergebnisse gab es dabei bei der Abstimmung: [47]. Einer der drei Interpreten erhielt eine Wildcard für die interne Vorentscheidung und stand somit in der engeren Auswahl aller vier Fernsehanstalten.

Diese wurden von Produzenten mit verschiedenen Sängern getestet. Nach diesem Schritt, hat sich die Jury erneut getroffen und die Ergebnisse bewertet.

Die folgende Tabelle zeigt, in welchem Modus die restlichen Teilnehmerländer die Auswahl ihres Interpreten und Liedes vorgenommen haben.

Die Auslosung der beiden Halbfinale fand am Die Einteilung der Töpfe erfolgte über das Abstimmungsmuster der vergangenen zehn Jahre. Danach wurden die Länder einem der beiden Halbfinale zugelost.

Darüber hinaus wurde auch ermittelt, in welchem Halbfinale die Big 5 Deutschland, Frankreich, Italien, Spanien und das Vereinigte Königreich, sowie der Gastgeber Israel stimmberechtigt sein werden.

Die Verteilung der Töpfe setzte sich wie folgt zusammen: [53]. Das erste Halbfinale mit 17 Teilnehmern fand am Die zehn bestplatzierten Länder qualifizierten sich für das Finale.

Ursprünglich war die Ukraine dem ersten Halbfinale zugeordnet. In der folgenden Tabelle sind die Punkte der Jury und des Televotings dargestellt.

Die grün unterlegten Länder zeigen an, dass sich das Land für das Finale qualifiziert hat. Das zweite Halbfinale fand mit 18 Teilnehmern am Das Finale fand am Hinzu kamen je zehn Länder aus den beiden Halbfinalen, sodass im Finale 26 Länder antraten.

Alle Teilnehmerländer waren abstimmungsberechtigt. Bis auf Russland waren alle der genannten Länder im jeweils genannten Zeitraum bereits im Halbfinale ausgeschieden.

Russland war lediglich ausgeschieden, hatte das Land nicht teilgenommen. Die Startreihenfolge des Finales wurde von den Produzenten bestimmt und am Freitag, dem Mai , veröffentlicht.

Die Big Five zogen bereits nach dem zweiten Probelauf auf der jeweiligen Pressekonferenz ihre Hälfte. Ein Mehr an Spannung schuf die neue Bekanntgaberegelung der Zuschauerstimmen.

Vom abgeschlagenen Feld konnten lediglich Norwegen als Bester der Zuschauerwertung und Island dreistellige Punktezuwächse verbuchen und noch unter die ersten Zehn gelangen.

Von den führenden Neun bekamen Schweden und Nordmazedonien nebst Tschechien keine dreistelligen Punktezahlen, so dass sie jeweils mehrere Ränge abrutschten.

Der niederländische Gewinner erhielt die drittmeisten Jury- und zweitmeisten Zuschauerpunkte. Durch eine Korrektur der Endergebnisse am So tauschte Schweden Platz 5 mit Norwegen, das nur noch auf Platz 6 liegt.

Ebenfalls tauschten Aserbaidschan und Nordmazedonien ihre Platzierungen. Slowenien hingegen rutschte von Platz 13 auf Platz 15 ab, wie auch Frankreich von Platz 14 auf Platz Änderungen gab es bei den Punktzahlen von weiteren zehn Teilnehmern, die sich nicht auf die Platzierung auswirkten.

Israel ist nach der Korrektur Letzter im Juryvoting mit 0 Punkten. Nordmazedonien statt zuvor Schweden hat das Juryvoting gewonnen.

Die Länder in der linken Spalte sind nach der Startreihenfolge sortiert, während die abstimmungsberechtigten Länder nach der Vergabe der Jurypunkte sortiert sind.

Das gelb unterlegte Land zeigt den ersten Platz und damit den Sieger. In der Tabelle sind die niedrigsten Hintergrund rot und höchsten Hintergrund grün Gesamtwerte gekennzeichnet.

Die 41 Punktesprecher gaben die Ergebnisse der Juryabstimmung ihrer Länder bekannt. Mai veröffentlichte die Europäische Rundfunkanstalt eine Zuschauerzahl von Millionen in Australien und Europa.

Damit schauten insgesamt drei Millionen Zuschauer weniger die Sendung als noch im Vorjahr. Die beiden Halbfinale wurden, wie bereits im Vorjahr, wieder auf One übertragen.

Moderiert wurden diese Berichte von Barbara Schöneberger vom Public Viewing am Spielbudenplatz in Hamburg , sie war ebenfalls zum wiederholten Male die deutsche Punktesprecherin.

Dazu dienen die Preview Partys dt. Das Eurovision in Concert fand am 6. Insgesamt war es die bereits elfte Ausgabe dieser Veranstaltung. Folgende 28 Länder nahmen am Eurovision in Concert teil: [].

Ursprünglich sollte auch der französische Teilnehmer Bilal Hassani auftreten. April gab er via Twitter bekannt, dass er am Eurovision in Concert nicht teilnehmen könne, ohne genaue Gründe für seine Absage anzugeben.

Er schrieb lediglich, dass diese Entscheidung nicht bei ihm liege. Insgesamt nahmen lediglich zwei Länder teil, was die niedrigste Teilnehmerzahl des Events seit seiner Einführung war: [].

Die London Eurovision Party fand am Auch Anna Bergendahl , die Schweden beim Eurovision Song Contest vertrat und an der schwedischen Vorentscheidung Melodifestivalen teilnahm, trat als spezieller Gast auf.

Insgesamt nahmen folgende 18 Länder an der London Eurovision Party teil: []. April im Sala La Riviera in Madrid statt. Organisiert wurde das Konzert von der Seite eurovision-spain.

Die Empfangsveranstaltung fand am April statt und wurde von Imri Ziv und Victor Escudero moderiert. Gäste der Veranstaltung waren unter anderem folgende: [].

Das Konzert mit den diesjährigen Eurovision Teilnehmern fand am Mit insgesamt 22 teilnehmenden Ländern wurde ein neuer Teilnehmerrekord für die Veranstaltung aufgestellt.

Folgende Länder nahmen teil: []. Die Moscow Eurovision Party fand am April in der Vegas Hall in Moskau statt. Insgesamt zwölf Länder nahmen teil, was einen neuen Rekord an Teilnehmern bei der Moscow Eurovision Party darstellte: [].

Am Morgen des Sollte sie Punkte des Vertrages brechen, müsste sie zwei Millionen Hrywnja , umgerechnet Umgekehrt müsste sie alle Kosten selber tragen, die in Verbindung mit dem Song Contest stehen, selbst das Visum für Israel.

Am Abend des Als endgültiger Grund wurde angegeben, dass durch die Politisierung der Vorentscheidung ein Konflikt nicht umgangen werden könne.

Hierbei handelt es sich um ein möglichen Zählfehler des italienischen Televotings. Vom italienischen Fernsehsender Rai wurden die Televotingergebnisse der italienischen Zuschauer im Finale sowie im zweiten Halbfinale in Prozent veröffentlicht.

Ein Verantwortlicher des italienischen Senders bestätigte, dass die Angaben von Rai richtig sind. Da Litauen eine höhere Punktzahl von den Zuschauern erhalten hat, hätte sich Litauen und nicht Dänemark für das Finale qualifiziert.

Zwei Mal sei das Bild schwarz geworden und nachdem das Bild wieder zu sehen war, sah man den Kameramann. Sollten die Bildstörungen tatsächlich das Jury-Ergebnis negativ beeinflusst haben, könne dies so Norwegen den Sieg gekostet haben.

Zu einer Zusage kam es jedoch nicht. Eurovision Song Contest. Bewerberstädte: Erfolgreiche Bewerbung, Erfolglose Bewerberstädte. PDF 7.

Mai , abgerufen am 8. Mai englisch. In: wiwibloggs. April , abgerufen am April englisch. In: eurovision.

In: eurovoix. Mai , abgerufen am Juli , abgerufen am Juli englisch. Mai hebräisch. In: timeout. Mai il.

In: globes. Juni , abgerufen am August , abgerufen am August englisch. In: esctoday. September , abgerufen am September englisch.

Juni englisch. In: kan. November , abgerufen am 4. Dezember hebräisch. Abgerufen am 8. Januar In: escxtra.

In: eurovisionworld. November , abgerufen am November englisch. Abgerufen am Dezember Januar , abgerufen am Januar englisch.

In: Eurovision. April März , abgerufen am März englisch. Oktober , abgerufen am Oktober englisch. Abgerufen am 7. Februar , abgerufen am Februar englisch.

Februar , abgerufen am 7. New act joins the line-up! Januar , abgerufen am 8. März , abgerufen am 8. Dezember , abgerufen am In: srf.

Oktober , abgerufen am 1. Oktober Juli In: rsi.

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